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Which players traded at the deadline have helped their new team the most?

Now that the dust has settled on the non-waiver trade deadline, let's look at which newly acquired players have had the greatest contribution to their new team in the short time that has passed.

Nick Turchiaro-USA TODAY Sports

When the clock struck 4:00 pm (East Coast bias) on July 31st, over 100 players had changed organizations. A few organizations pushed their chips into the middle of the table, acquiring high profile starting pitchers and position players at the deadline. Others made more modest investments. We're only a week and a half into August, but it's not too soon to look at how these deadline deals have paid off so far.

There are a several ways that you can measure the impact of a player on a team. You could look at overall production. Wins above replacement -- in this case FanGraphs' WAR -- is great measuring stick for this as it summarizes a players' offensive and defensive contributions without considering the situation in which these events took place. You could also consider win probability added (WPA), a stat that takes the context of each plate appearance into account.

First, let's consider the impact of position players traded at the deadline. The Blue Jays may have made the biggest splash when they managed to pry Troy Tulowitzki away from the Colorado Rockies just before he earned 10-and-5 rights. Tulo was having one of his worst seasons at the plate before he was traded, posting a mediocre 107 wRC+ over 351 PA. Despite leaving the hitter's paradise that is Coors Field, Tulowitzki has rediscovered his stroke with Toronto, slugging 3 HRs in just 53 PA and posting 0.9 fWAR. This leads all players traded at the deadline. Even more impressive, he's nearly equaled his production with Colorado over the first four months when he posted 1.1 fWAR.

Name PA HR SB wRC+ fWAR WPA
Troy Tulowitzki 53 3 1 136 0.9 0.16
Ben Zobrist 42 3 0 179 0.4 0.47
Carlos Gomez 45 1 3 73 0.2 -0.26
Yoenis Cespedes 39 0 1 83 0.2 0.00
Juan Uribe 43 3 0 81 0.0 -0.01
Shane Victorino 18 0 0 52 0.0 -0.11
Ben Revere 35 0 0 4 -0.1 -0.48
Michael Morse 8 0 0 38 -0.1 -0.17
Brandon Moss 31 0 0 21 -0.2 -0.28
Dustin Ackley 3 0 0 -100 -0.2 0.00
David DeJesus 29 0 0 -37 -0.4 -0.44
David Murphy 38 1 0 66 -0.4 0.08
Gerardo Parra 41 1 0 53 -0.4 -0.25
Aramis Ramirez 52 0 0 39 -0.5 -0.89

Thinking about the position player that has had the most impact in terms of WPA, new Royals utility man Ben Zobrist takes the cake. Obi Wan Zonobi has come through for the club in high leverage situations, leading positions players with 0.47 WPA. Much of this was accrued during his two HR performance on August 1st, particularly the one he hit off new Blue Jays reliever Mark Lowe in the top of the eighth to tie the game 5-5 (0.28 WPA).


Source: FanGraphs

Aramis Ramirez, on the other hand, may have given the Pittsburgh Pirates a case of buyers' remorse as his -0.5 fWAR and -0.89 WPA rank last among position players traded. Ramirez's (lack of) production has been "sustained" as he posted a negative WPA in each of his first 11 games with the Bucs.

Of the pitchers traded at the deadline, the three aces dealt have answered the bell with their new teams, all finding themselves at or near the top of the list in fWAR. On the heels of his first home start -- a complete game shutout of the Detroit Tigers -- Johnny Cueto leads all newly acquired pitchers with 0.8 fWAR.

Matt Boyd and Daniel Norris, two pitchers shipped to Detroit in the David Price deal, have given Tigers fans plenty to be excited about after their first two appearances. Boyd in particular has dazzled, equaling David Price in fWAR (0.5) despite pitching fewer innings. Each of the rookie starters has flashed enough talent in his first two starts to make it easy to picture them handing the ball to Brad Ausmus late in ball games. Most impressively, the two have walked just a pair of batters between them across 23 IP.

David Price's success, on the other hand, is less surprising and more likely to be sustained. He has dominated in his two starts with the Blue Jays and posted the greatest WPA (0.64) of any pitcher moved at the deadline. Price has added stability to the Blue Jays rotation and -- along with a lineup that could dominate any mixed 10-team fantasy league -- helped the team surge up the AL East standings.

Name IP ERA FIP K% BB% fWAR WPA
Johnny Cueto 22.0 2.05 2.1 20% 5% 0.8 0.43
David Price 15.0 0.60 2.57 32% 9% 0.5 0.64
Matt Boyd 12.1 2.92 2.05 16% 2% 0.5 0.17
Scott Kazmir 20.1 0.44 3.35 16% 8% 0.4 0.49
J.A. Happ 4.1 8.31 1.72 26% 9% 0.2 -0.18
LaTroy Hawkins 5.2 0.00 1.34 24% 0% 0.2 0.44
Alex Wood 11.1 5.56 3.54 25% 9% 0.1 0.02
Daniel Norris 10.2 5.06 4.32 18% 2% 0.1 -0.12
Joakim Soria 4.2 0.00 3.10 16% 11% 0.1 0.18
Steve Cishek 6.0 1.50 3.10 13% 4% 0.1 0.09
Mike Fiers 11.2 5.40 4.64 20% 8% 0.0 0.06
Mike Leake 6.1 2.84 4.52 19% 7% 0.0 0.03
Jonathan Broxton 4.1 2.08 5.18 31% 13% -0.1 -0.37
Jonathan Papelbon 4.0 2.25 4.85 19% 0% -0.1 0.26
Mat Latos 10.0 6.30 6.10 2% 5% -0.1 -0.33
Tyler Clippard 6.2 1.35 5.35 7% 7% -0.1 -0.08
Cole Hamels 13.2 5.93 6.61 24% 6% -0.2 -0.39
Dan Haren 5.0 5.40 8.30 13% 8% -0.2 -0.22
Jim Johnson 3.2 29.45 10.19 24% 12% -0.4 -1.21

Leading relief pitchers in both WAR (0.2) and WPA (0.44) is LaTroy Hawkins. Hawkins, the oldest pitcher in the game, joined the youngest in Roberto Osuna in the Blue Jays bullpen. After earning a save against the Minnesota Twins last week, the two may have become the most unlikely co-closers in the league.

There are plenty of other fun storylines contained in these lists. Cole Hamels has struggled over his first two starts with the Texas Rangers. Jim Johnson is underperforming his FIP, which is tough to do when your FIP is over 10.00. J.A. Happ has the lowest FIP of any starter traded but also has the highest ERA. Of course, it's important to remember that the small sample size disclaimer applies when you consider the performance of players over this limited time frame. However, in dealing for an expiring contract, many GMs have mortgaged their team's future over a sample that isn't that large itself.

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Matt Jackson is a featured writer for Beyond the Box Score and a staff writer for Royals Review. You can follow him on Twitter at @jacksontaigu.