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Community Guidelines Reminder

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With the number of members and comments per thread increasing, it's a good time to review some of the BtB Community Guidelines.  They're all an integral part of what we have going on, but here are those that seem particularly relevant right now and/or might be different from other websites and SBN blogs:

  • You can disagree with everything and everyone, as long as you don't make it personal and you back up your arguments with logic.  Logic does not include excessive capitals, ad hominem attacks, cliches, or quotes from ESPN "experts".
  • We like numbers.  Love 'em, in fact.  If you are not familiar with sabermetrics, we encourage you to stick around and learn something.  If you disagree with an argument made using statistics, make sure you understand the methodology before disagreeing with the results.  Asking questions is a great way to advance both the discussion and your understanding of sabermetrics.  We also realize that numbers aren't perfect and are always looking to improve them.
  • Keep the language and photos PG.  Sure, we've heard and seen it all, but most comments that rely on colorful language aren't worth posting anyway.  We are especially intolerant of ignorance -- racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia, etc.

Yes, that means we'd like you to resist using the f-bomb, the s-word, calling someone gay or retarded, or using other similar verbiage.  If you wouldn't say it around your friends' younger sibling or offspring, don't say it here.  We've been spotty in moderating that language, but don't be surprised if your comments disappear because of it.  "Dweeb" isn't a bad alternative to start using, mostly because you can't use it very seriously.

One last thing I'll add is to try as hard as possible to give others the benefit of the doubt.  Between them not typing quite what they meant, both your prejudices, and the way you read a comment, it's likely that a lot gets lost in translation.  Try not to put words in others' mouths and make an effort to interpret what they're saying in the light that you'd most agree with.  Let's avoid the fire-ready-aim paradigm.